3rd Annual Downriver Day of Percussion

What is the Downriver Day of Percussion?

The Downriver Day of Percussion is a day of presentations, clinics, and workshops designed to aid school-aged percussionists looking to continue to grow as musicians. This one-day event features masterclasses from successful educators and percussionists. Best yet, it will greatly aid in building a sense of community amongst our area percussionists and offer many opportunities to network with…

Downriver Day of Percussion

3rd Annual
Downriver Day of Percussion
Saturday, May 3, 2014

9:15am – Registration
9:45am – 4:30pm – Event
6:30pm – Concert

Wyandotte Roosevelt High School
540 Eureka, Wyandotte, MI 48192

Online registration available @ facebook.com/downriverdayofpercussion
Contact DownriverDayofPercussion@gmail.com for more info!
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The 3rd Annual Downriver Day of Percussion is a day of presentations designed to aid school-aged percussionists looking to continue to grow as musicians. This one-day event features masterclasses from successful educators and percussionists. Best yet, it will greatly aid in building a sense of community amongst our area percussionists and offer many opportunities to network with participants and presenters! DDOP promised to include hands-on opportunities in World Percussion, Mallet Percussion, Concert Percussion, Marching Percussion, and Drumset. Everyone in attendance will have a great opportunity to hear from educators who have found success through various percussive mediums.

The 2014 Downriver Day of Percussion Artists in Residence are LOS GATOS!
Los Gatos was the brainchild of drummer and bandleader, Pete Siers in 1997. (Pete was the 2012 DDoP Keynote) The concept of a small group, combined with traditional Afro-Cuban rhythms has since positioned Los Gatos as a consistent crowd pleaser. Los Gatos is built from the “old-school” Latin jazz values set forth by Cal Tjader, Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente and Joe Cuba. Unlike many traditional Latin jazz groups with six or more members, Los Gatos is a quintet, a combination which dramatically exposes the function of each component of the band.

The five members of the group are world class performers. They have each toured extensively and have been performing with Los Gatos for over a decade. The band members are also professional educators and excel and sharing their love and knowledge of the art. Members of the band include; Pete Siers – percussion, Cary Kocher – vibraphone, Kurt Krahnke – bass, Brian DiBlassio – piano, and Owl DiBlassio – congas.
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Pre-Registration Incentive – Pre-register by mail before April 11th and be entered in our Early Bird door prizes. Students registering BEFORE April 11 (postmarked) will receive a FREE DDoP T-Shirt, a FREE lunch, and be entered to win one of our Early Bird door prizes. ($100+ value!)

Online Registration is now available:

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/3rd-annual-downriver-day-of-percussion-registration-10629425899?aff=es2

- OR -

facebook.com/downriverdayofpercussion

Music Together Spring 2014

Music Together Spring 2014

 

Shake Shake Shake – It’s Maracas Time!

Music Together Spring 2014We are going to wake up Spring and all of the flowers and animals with our Spring “Maracas” collection! We are especially excited to jive together with everyone to one of our all-time favorite Music Together songs “All Around the Kitchen!” It’s a jazzy tune we know everyone will love! Listen to the song and see a trailer for the storybook online here.

 Happy Birthday Parties!!

Did you know Hummingbirds Music Together is available to help make birthday parties extra special and fun? We work with you to create a special musical celebration including your child’s favorite songs and activities from class. We can also provide ideas for musical party ideas, favors and more to make your child’s celebration as special as can be! Call us or ask us in class to learn more about party options at our location or a nearby location and to secure your child’s special day!

 Upcoming Events and Important Reminders:

 Week of April 21st: There are no classes this week.

Week of June 16 – 21: Last official week of Spring semester.

 

Sing and Sign in the Summer!

Every Fourth Friday in June, July, & August, 10:00 – 11:00 am: Join us for Sing & Sign this summer at the Rotary Tot Lot in Grosse Pointe. This fun interactive event incorporates singing, sign language, rhythm and movement and afterwards the kiddos can also enjoy making a craft.  The Rotary Tot Lot is located at the corner of St. Clair and Waterloo in the City of Grosse Pointe.

Our Biggest Hummingbirds Music Together Sing-along Yet! 

In March we hosted our biggest group of 130 kiddos, parents, grandparents, and caregivers at the Canton Public Library. It was a jammed packed hour of smiles, shakes and of course singing! It was amazing to meet so many new friends and share our love of music and movement. We will be visiting the Canton Public Library throughout the summer and hope you can make it with friends and family for a fun morning!

“Like” Hummingbirds Music Together on Facebook & Follow Us on Twitter

In addition to all our weekly fun in class, follow Hummingbirds Music Together for musical activities at home, local events and giveaway contests. At the end of March we held a Facebook Ukulele giveaway and four lucky winners were randomly selected and announced April 1. Congratulations to our winners! “Like” Hummingbirds Music Together on Facebook and select to “Receive Notifications” to see all of our updates. If you also use Twitter, follow us at @hummingbirdsmt.

 

Hey, hey, what do you say – let’s all have fun shaking our maracas this semester!

-Miss Sarah, Miss Emily & Miss Hazima

Jazz Cafe Open Mic

Jazz Cafe Open Mic

Want to share your musical talent and gain exposure?  This event gives local musicians and performers an opportunity to perform in front of a live audience and band.

DETEVENTS PRESENTS:

SPOTLIGHT

The Quarterly Series

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014
Spotlight is a Quarterly open mic night event for all ages held at the Detroit Music Hall’s Jazz Cafe. The first event in this series will be Wednesday, June 11th.  The doors will open at 7pm.  The show starts at 7:30 and will end at 9:00-9:30pm.  Performers that are interested in playing should send an email to: detevents@outlook.com.  Each performer will get 4-5 minutes maximum.  All styles of music are welcome so sign up now before all spaces are full!
Jazz Cafe Open Mic

The Element led by Darell Red Campbell will be there as an accompaniment band!

The Jazz Cafe has a full bar and serves food.

There is a $7 admission fee for all non-performing guests.

Local Comedian,  will also be there to host the show.

Invite your family and your friends and come out to the Jazz Cafe at Detroit Music Hall to showcase your talents!

Ethan Daniel Davidson

Ethan Daniel Davidson

May 22, 8pm Jazz Cafe at The Music Hall

ethan daniel davidsonNEW ALBUM

Drawnigh is Ethan Daniel Davidson’s new album.  Drawnigh’s chapters and  verses are filled with fiery tales of hard times, dark nights lit only by a whisky moon, troubled soldiers returning after long wars, and unfaithful servants straight out of the Old Testament.

2012′s Silvertooth album was praised for its personal message and organic warmth; Drawnigh shares its predecessor’s dark interest in atmospheric folk and haunted horn sections but goes further in exploring gospel harmonies, volcanic guitar feedback and textural layers of drawn from a lake of fire.  Ethan’s years at the Jewish Theological Seminary and studying Islamic Law and Turkish Literature and Philosophy influence the lyrical themes as well as the art that adorns the sleeve itself.  Drawnigh’s cover photos were taken while traveling around the ancient cities and bordering crossings of Turkey, Syria, Iran as well as a couple beautiful sunsets on the Yukon River in Alaska.

BACKGROUND

Ethan is kind of a folk singer, a troubadour whose last tour was six years long and who gave away fifty thousand copies of his last album.

PRESS QUOTES

“Ethan Daniel Davidson is that kind of legendary folk singer who supposedly died off a generation ago. He’s been all over the country, he knows the words to any song you could request and most importantly, he’s a master storyteller.”  Magnet Magazine (2012)

“The ultimate slow-drive, elements of Leonard Cohen at the edges, appropriate for a song about packing up and turning your eyes against the sentiments of departure, austere and lush”

- 32ft Per Second (2012)

“After years as a nomadic bohemian — living in the Alaskan wilderness, trading firewood for moose meat, hopping cargo ships to Europe — with home base at an isolated Alaska cabin — 270 miles from electricity — he crisscrossed the country for six years in a van, playing more than

900 shows and giving away 50,000 albums.”

- Detroit Free Press (2012)

MORE INFO

For more information, photos, and free music please visit www.ethandanieldavidson.com

Michigan Opera Theatre

A View from the Bridge at the Michigan Opera Theatre

By Patricia Lawlis

The two act opera, A View from the Bridge, after Arthur Miller’s play by the same name, first premièred at the Chicago Lyric Opera in 1999.  The story follows protagonist Eddie Carbone as his taboo attraction for his niece leads him to the role of informer and eventually results in his death.  Sung in English, Arnold Weinstein and Arthur Miller wrote the libretto, while William Bolcom composed the music.

michigan opera theatreThe idea for Arthur Miller’s original one-act play (later to be rewritten in two acts), came from the real life events of a longshoreman reporting two brothers to Immigration.  After hearing this story in 1947 and the subsequent events in Arthur Miller’s own life relating to the period of McCarthyism, he eventually captured the story in his play in 1955.[i]  A View from the Bridge is, in part, a culmination of the McCarthy era and Arthur Miller’s own experience with informers.  In the early 1950s, Arthur Miller was a member of a group of writers, journalists, and publishers who came together to write articles attacking McCarthy.  Although no one would publish these articles, the group drew notice and was eventually infiltrated and broken up by the FBI.[ii]  Miller would later be called before the HUAC in 1956, after the opening of A View from the Bridge, and his subsequent refusal to inform on the members of his anti-McCarthy group landed him in prison in contempt of Congress, although this sentence was later thrown out on appeal.[iii]

 

This play works in the operatic form both as a result of the social commentary, and because of the classical Greek style format of the original 1955 work.  The social commentary in A View from the Bridge is centered around Miller’s exploration into the lives of those who, like Eddie Carbone, jeopardize the cohesive nature of their communities as a result of fear, selfishness, or an unwillingness to accept responsibility for their actions.[iv]  It was during Miller’s studies at the University of Michigan that he first turned to social commentary through theatre because “it was the cockpit of literary activity and you could talk directly to an audience and radicalize the people.”[v]  Unlike the more impersonal audience/performer relationship found in films, Miller’s works are best realized through a medium of live performance on the stage.[vi]  This is because Miller works to speak directly to his audience, he relies on the flexible nature of live theatre to capture the social issues of the moment and bring them to the attention of the audience, unlike in film where the recording is a stagnate production.  The idea that live performance is the best medium for his works comes from his theory that the ability for a work to survive depends on “an ability to read the shifting text of society… [along with] a desire to reach back beyond some temporal divide and acknowledge continuity.”[vii]  Miller advocates for live performance, as offered in theatre or opera, even as his views on a constantly evolving society allow for his works to transition to new mediums to reach new audiences, while still keeping ties to the past and his original work.

 

Along with the transitional benefits of a live audience, Miller’s 1955 play was an ideal piece for the operatic medium because, unlike the later revision, it was written in verse with a chorus following the influence of classical Greek dramatists.[viii]  Rather than needing to completely rework the text of the play for opera, therefore, large amounts of the script were already ‘singable’ and able to transition to a libretto.[ix]  Additionally, the nature of the chorus also played a major role in the ease of operatic transition.  In classical Greek drama as well as in operatic works, the chorus has the ability to bring subtext to the forefront as a driving element to the action.[x]  The result was that the 1955 play was already designed to speak to the audience and progress through the action with the same approach as in opera.  The influence of the Greek drama can also be seen in the role of Eddie as he follows in the wake of the classical Greek protagonist.  His tragedy plays out as one that is both easily predictable, and yet impossible, under the personality restrictions of his character, to avoid.[xi]

 

The final supporting feature of this work as an opera comes from the fact that Miller was completely cooperative and supportive of the endeavor to turn the work into an opera, and even played a major role in the shift from theatrical verse to libretto.[xii]  Working with Arnold Weinstein, the two writers approached William Bolcom with the first general sketch in 1994, and while much of the libretto came from the original work, Miller also provided complete cooperation and new text at Bolcom’s request.[xiii]

 

The operatic rendition of A View from the Bridge will run at the Michigan Opera Theatre from Saturday April 5th until Sunday April 13th, and a special free event on March 25th will feature composer William Bolcom as he talks about his collaboration with the two librettists and the creation of the work.  For more information about the production or the young adult, Access Opera program, go to http://www.michiganopera.org/.

Bibliography

Bigsby, Christopher, ed.  The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller: Second Edition.

New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

 

Brater, Enoch, ed.  Arthur Miller’s America: Theater & Culture in a Time of Change.

Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005.



[i] Christopher Bigsby, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller: Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) 104.

[ii] Christopher Bigsby, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller: Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) 3.

[iii] Christopher Bigsby, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller: Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) 3.

[iv] Christopher Bigsby, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller: Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) 4.

[v] Christopher Bigsby, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller: Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) 2.

[vi] Enoch Brater, ed., Arthur Miller’s America: Theater & Culture in a Time of Change (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005) 237.

[vii] Christopher Bigsby, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller: Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) 6.

[viii] Christopher Bigsby, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller: Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) 13.

[ix] Enoch Brater, ed., Arthur Miller’s America: Theater & Culture in a Time of Change (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005) 238.

[x] Enoch Brater, ed., Arthur Miller’s America: Theater & Culture in a Time of Change (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005) 240.

[xi] Christopher Bigsby, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller: Second Edition (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) 17.

[xii] Enoch Brater, ed., Arthur Miller’s America: Theater & Culture in a Time of Change (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005) 237.

[xiii] Enoch Brater, ed., Arthur Miller’s America: Theater & Culture in a Time of Change (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005) 236, 241.

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